Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Dai Nippon Judo-Jujitsu Kai

Farwell, Michigan 48622

 

CAUSE AND EFFECT
OF STRIKING
THE HUMAN BODY

 

INDEX

 

1. FRONT

A. HEAD

  1. Coronal suture
  2. Frontal fontanel
  3. Temple

 

B. FACE

  1. Circumorbital region
  2. Eyeball
  3. Glabella
  4. Intermaxillary suture
  5. Center of lower jaw
  6. Base of Mandible

 

C. MIDDLE

  1. Side of the Neck
  2. Supraclavicular fossa
  3. Suprasternal notch
  4. Sternal angle
  5. Xiphoid process
  6. Solar plexus
  7. Tanjun
  8. Subaxillary region
  9. Region below the nipples
  10. Abdomen, hypochondriac region
  11. Abdomen, lumbar region

 

D. WRIST AND HAND

  1. Inside wrist
  2. Back of hand

 

E. LOWER SECTION

  1. Inguinal region
  2. Lateral lower thigh
  3. Medial malleolus
  4. Instep
  5. Foot, top, lateral part
  6. Middle of Fibula
  7. Testes

 

2. BACK

A. UPPER SECTION

  1. Concavity behind the ear
  2. Back of the neck

 

B. MIDDLE SECTION

  1. Scapular ridge, middle
  2. Space between 5th & 6th Thoracic vertebrae
  3. Lumbar region
  4. Tip of Spine
  5. Upper arm, Dorsal surface
  6. Lateral surface of elbow
  7. Dorsal surface of wrist

 

C. LOWER SECTION

  1. Gluteal fold
  2. Soleus muscle, lower part.

 



FRONT: HEAD AND FACE

Coronal suture: Line of juncture of the Frontal bone and the Parietal bones. Cause of death is severe trauma to the Cerebrum and disruptive stimulation of Cranial nerves.

Frontal Fontanel: The region of the head between the Forehead and the Coronal Suture that is exposed and seen to pulsate in a newborn infant. Cause of death is concussion and trauma to Cranial nerves.

Temple: Especially Suture of Zygomatic (Cheekbone) and Frontal Bone. Loss of consciousness is due to trauma to Cranial nerves, resulting in loss of sensory and motor functions.

Circumorbital region: Upper and lower parts of eye socket. Loss of consciousness results from Cerebral trauma and resulting loss of nervous control.

Eyeball: Loss of consciousness produced by severe trauma to Cerebrum resulting in disruptive stimulation of Cranial nerves and loss of sensory and motor functions.

Glabella: The point at the base of the nose between the eyes. Loss of consciousness results from severe trauma to Cerebrum leading to disruptive stimulation of Cranial nerves and loss of sensory and motor functions.

Intermaxillary suture: Juncture of left and right upper jawbones below nose. Loss of consciousness results from trauma to Cranial nerves and loss of sensory and motor functions.

Center of lower jaw: One-half inch (1/2") below lower lip. Loss of consciousness results from trauma to Cranial nerves and loss of sensory and motor functions.

Base of Mandible: Lower ridge of lower jaw; also the articulation below and in front of the ears. Loss of consciousness results from concussion and loss of nervous coordination.

A blow to any of the Vital Points of the face causes trauma to the Cranial nerves resulting in loss of nervous coordination and consciousness as well as Vascular Shock. There are eleven (11) Cranial nerves, possessing sensory, motor or mixed functions as follows below:

  1. Olfactorius
  2. Opticus
  3. Oculomotoris
  4. Trochlearis
  5. Trigeminus
  6. Abducens
  7. Facialis
  8. Acousticus
  9. Glossopharyngeus
  10. Vagus Spinal Accessorius
  11. Hypoglossus

 



FRONT: MIDDLE SECTION

Side of the neck: The length of the Sternocleidomastoid muscle covered by the Platysma. Cause of loss of consciousness is trauma to the Carotid Artery and the Pneumogastric Nerve leading to Shock and to loss of sensory and motor functions.

Supraclavicular Fossa: Front portion of the throat on either side, just above the collar bone at the origin of the Lateral Head of the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle. The cause of consciousness is trauma to the Artery located below the collar bone and to the Sublingual nerve, producing Shock and loss of motor functions.

Suprasternal Notch: The concavity on the Ventral surface of the neck between the Sternum below and the Hyoid bone above. The cause of loss of consciousness is blocking the windpipe.

Sternal Angle: Just below the juncture of the Manubrium and the Sternum. The cause of loss of consciousness is trauma to the Heart, Broncus and Arteries supplying the upper part of the body, and the Pulmonary Artery, leading to the malfunction of the Respiratory system and shock.

Xiphoid Process: Lowest part of the Sternum. The cause of loss of consciousness is severe trauma to the Liver, Stomach and Heart, leading to shock and to disturbance of the nervous system followed by the loss of motor functions.

Solar Plexus: Concavity just below the Sternum. The loss of consciousness is caused by trauma to the Stomach and Liver, leading to damage to adjacent regions above and below, and intern will effect will effect the nerves that produce the loss of function of the Internal organs.

Tanjun: Point about one inch (1") below the Naval. The loss of consciousness is caused by trauma to the Small Intestine and Bladder and will effect the large blood vessels and nerves in the Abdomen, producing shock and loss of motor functions.

Subaxillary region: Fourth (4th) Intercostal space. The loss of consciousness results from severe trauma to the Lungs and the associated nerves, leading to the loss of the Lung function and stoppage of breathing and circulatory failure.

Region below the Nipples: Between the fifth (5th) and sixth (6th) ribs on either side. The cause of loss of consciousness is similar to that in the preceding case, i.e., the loss of Lung function, stoppage of breath and circulatory failure.

Abdomen, Hypochondriac region: Seventh (7th) Intercostal space. The cause of the loss of consciousness is different for the left and right sides. One the right side, it is severe trauma to the Liver, leading to the loss of nervous function associated with the Liver and Lungs. One the left side, it is severe trauma to the Stomach and Spleen with effects on the Heart and Lungs, producing the loss of nervous function associated with the Heart and Lungs.

Abdomen, Lumbar region: Eleventh (11th) Intercostal space. The loss of consciousness is different for the left and right sides and is nearly the same as that of the Hypochondriac region.

Attacks to the Vital Points mentioned up to this point, which are located in the chest and abdominal regions; all will result in primary trauma to internal organs with disruptive effects on the Spinal Cord and Sympathetic nervous System. This in turn affects the Cranial nerves leading to the loss of consciousness caused by shock and by loss of breathing. It is noteworthy in this connection that attacks to Vital Points located in the Head do not always lead to the loss of breathing in spite of the loss of sensory and motor functions.



WRIST and HAND

Inside wrist: Between Brachioradilis and Flexor Muscles of the fingers. An attack to this point produces trauma to the underlying nerve and artery, leading to an unusual type of pain that affects the Chest and Throat regions and causes the loss of motor functions and the loss of consciousness.

Back of hand: Especially the points between Thumb and the Index finger, also points between Middle and Ring finger. The cause of the loss of consciousness is shock to the Median nerve leading to an unusual type of pain in the Chest and Throat regions that will produce the loss of motor function. A similar result is to be expected from striking any one of the bones located at the back of the hand.



FRONT: LOWER SECTION

Inguinal region: The Inner region of the upper thigh; part of the musculature of the Pubic bones. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the underlying Artery and Nerve, as well as to the closing nerve, causing an unusual type of pain in the Hip and Abdomen that produces the loss of motor function.

Lateral lower thigh: Middle part of the Lateral Vastus Muscle. The cause of the loss of consciousness is cramping of the muscle in the thigh, leading to pain in the lower Abdomen and the loss of motor function in the leg.

Medial malleous: The point just below the Medialtuberosity of the Tibia. Although this term usually indicates the lowest part of the Shinbone, i.e., the inside surface of the Ankle, as used to identify a point of attack denotes a point on the Medial surface of the Tarsal bone just below the Ankle. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to Tibial Artery, causing an unusual type of pain in the Hip area that leads to the loss of motor function.

Foot, top, lateral part: Just below the heads of the fourth (4th) and fifth (5th) Metatarsals. The cause of the loss of consciousness is similar to that in the preceding case.

Middle of fibula: An attack to this point produces trauma to the Fibular Nerve, leading to severe pain and the loss of upright posture.

Testes: The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the nerves and arteries of the Testicles and Groin, inducing the Testicles to rise and in turn producing the loss of motor function and the inability to breathe.



BACK: UPPER SECTION

Concavity behind the ear: Between the Mastoid Process and the lower jaw. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Cranial Nerves and the Spinal Cord, resulting in the loss of sensory and motor function.

Back of the Neck: The Third (3rd) Intervertebral space. The cause of the loss of consciousness is severe trauma to the Cerebrum, Cranial Nerves and the Spinal Cord, producing the loss of sensory and motor functions.



BACK: MIDDLE SECTION

Scapular ridge, middle: The level of the third (3rd) Intercostal space. The cause of the loss of consciousness is severe trauma to the Lungs and Spinal Cord, producing difficulty in breathing and blood circulation with the loss of motor function.

Space between fifth (5th) and sixth (6th) Thoracic Vertebrae: The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Spinal Cord, Aorta, Heart and Lungs, leading to the loss of sensory and motor functions, and in turn, stopping the breathing.

Lumbar region: The left and right sides of the ninth (9th) and eleventh (11th) Thoracic Vertebrae. The two (2) sides of the Eleventh (11th) Thoracic Vertebrae are the more effective points for attack. The cause of the loss of consciousness is severe trauma to the Kidneys and associated Nerves and Blood Vessels, leading in turn to shock and the loss of motor function.

Tip of spine: The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the entire Spinal Cord, leading to Cerebral trauma and the loss of sensory and motor function.

Upper arm, dorsal surface: The Middle part between the Bicep and Triceps. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Ulnar and Median nerves and blood vessels of the upper arm. This produces an unusual type of pain in the Chest and Neck and also the loss of motor functions.

Lateral surface of the elbow: The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Ulnar Nerve producing an unusual type of pain in the Chest and Neck also causing the loss of motor functions.

Dorsal surface of the wrist: The space between the ends of the Radius and Ulna. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Median Nerve and the loss of motor functions.



BACK: LOWER SECTION

Gluteal fold: The central portion of the back of the upper thigh just below the Buttock. The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Sciatic Nerve that produces an unusual type of pain in the Abdomen and Hip regions, also the loss of motor functions.

Soleus muscle, Lower part: The cause of the loss of consciousness is trauma to the Tibial Artery and Tibal Nerve, this produces an unusual type of pain in the Abdominal and Hip regions which causes the loss of motor functions.